Home    Ask    Archive   RSS

Prefer the Present

"No matter: with words, the Other reappears."

"Qui est là? Qui est là?"
"Ché Coco, Ché Coco."

last.fm | facebook | in lieu of something real | raving through dark nights | twitter | mubi | celluloid imaginary | instagram

16th
Apr
Mon
  • branduponthebrain:

Jiro Dreams of Sushi (David Gelb, 2011)

    branduponthebrain:

    Jiro Dreams of Sushi (David Gelb, 2011)

  • 16th
    Apr
    Mon
  • branduponthebrain:

Jiro Dreams of Sushi (David Gelb, 2011)

thug life

    branduponthebrain:

    Jiro Dreams of Sushi (David Gelb, 2011)

    thug life

  • 30th
    Apr
    Sat
  • That concludes my coverage of the 2011 Tribeca Film Festival.

    Highest recommended films: Give Up Tomorrow (Michael Collins and Marty Syjuco), The Trip (Michael Winterbottom), Jiro Dreams of Sushi (David Gelb), Bombay Beach (Alma Har’el), Higher Ground (Vera Farmiga).

    Honorable mention: Beats, Rhymes & Life: The Travels of a Tribe Called Quest (Michael Rapaport)

  • 30th
    Apr
    Sat
  • Treatment (directed by Steven Schardt and Sean Nelson) | 2011 | 83m | Viewpoints | World Premiere
A vaguely entertaining but unsuccessful satire on the life of a mega movie star and the independent screenwriter who wants to recruit him for a timely piece on the financial crisis, Steven Schardt and Sean Nelson’s Treatment is always winking at the viewer, maintaining a selfconsciousness in regards to comedic moments that becomes overbearing by the end. Joshua Leonard tries his hardest to save the film but he is given such slight material to work with that it becomes futile, especially at the end when everything takes a turn towards the self-serious and easy moralizing. The energy is high, but there’s just nowhere to go with this one - Robyn Hitchcock’s soundtrack is excellent standalone work, and his cameo is entertaining, but it cannot lift this film up beyond bland mediocrity. 

    Treatment (directed by Steven Schardt and Sean Nelson) | 2011 | 83m | Viewpoints | World Premiere

    A vaguely entertaining but unsuccessful satire on the life of a mega movie star and the independent screenwriter who wants to recruit him for a timely piece on the financial crisis, Steven Schardt and Sean Nelson’s Treatment is always winking at the viewer, maintaining a selfconsciousness in regards to comedic moments that becomes overbearing by the end. Joshua Leonard tries his hardest to save the film but he is given such slight material to work with that it becomes futile, especially at the end when everything takes a turn towards the self-serious and easy moralizing. The energy is high, but there’s just nowhere to go with this one - Robyn Hitchcock’s soundtrack is excellent standalone work, and his cameo is entertaining, but it cannot lift this film up beyond bland mediocrity. 

  • 29th
    Apr
    Fri
  • Beats, Rhymes & Life: The Travels of A Tribe Called Quest (directed by Michael Rapaport) | 2011 | 98m | Spotlight | New York Premiere
After an brilliantly animated opening credits sequence, longtime actor and first-time director Michael Rapaport starts at the end, showing clips he shot of legendary New York hip hop group A Tribe Called Quest at the Rock the Bells tour in 2008, what they would deem their final performance. Utilizing talking head interviews by genre insiders (Common, Pharrell, Blackthought and Questlove of The Roots, De La Soul, Beastie Boys to name a few) explaining their influence and archival footage of Tribe during their rise to fame, Rapaport, clearly passionate about his subjects, has made a film that should appeal to both fans and those unfamiliar with this game-changing hip hop crew. Spending an ample amount of time on the beef between Phife and Q-Tip and Phife’s health issues, Beats, Rhymes & Life offers a cursory glance at ATCQ in their prime and could have benefited from longer sequences featuring the actual music and how it was created. It’s hard to fault Rapaport, because while he does achieve a clear feeling of nostalgia and joy with this work (it’ll undoubtedly make you think about why there aren’t more documentaries made about hip hop), there is a lingering concern that he focuses too much on the petty drama between the group’s members. 

    Beats, Rhymes & Life: The Travels of A Tribe Called Quest (directed by Michael Rapaport) | 2011 | 98m | Spotlight | New York Premiere

    After an brilliantly animated opening credits sequence, longtime actor and first-time director Michael Rapaport starts at the end, showing clips he shot of legendary New York hip hop group A Tribe Called Quest at the Rock the Bells tour in 2008, what they would deem their final performance. Utilizing talking head interviews by genre insiders (Common, Pharrell, Blackthought and Questlove of The Roots, De La Soul, Beastie Boys to name a few) explaining their influence and archival footage of Tribe during their rise to fame, Rapaport, clearly passionate about his subjects, has made a film that should appeal to both fans and those unfamiliar with this game-changing hip hop crew. Spending an ample amount of time on the beef between Phife and Q-Tip and Phife’s health issues, Beats, Rhymes & Life offers a cursory glance at ATCQ in their prime and could have benefited from longer sequences featuring the actual music and how it was created. It’s hard to fault Rapaport, because while he does achieve a clear feeling of nostalgia and joy with this work (it’ll undoubtedly make you think about why there aren’t more documentaries made about hip hop), there is a lingering concern that he focuses too much on the petty drama between the group’s members. 

  • 28th
    Apr
    Thu
  • Bombay Beach (Alma Har’el, 2011)

    Bombay Beach (Alma Har’el, 2011)

  • 28th
    Apr
    Thu
  • Bombay Beach (Alma Har’el, 2011)

    Bombay Beach (Alma Har’el, 2011)

  • 28th
    Apr
    Thu
  • Bombay Beach (Alma Har’el)

    Bombay Beach (Alma Har’el)

  • »

    Accent Red by Neil Talwar